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Microfluidics and Electronics for High Throughput Biology

Research in our lab is focused on microfluidics, bioMEMS, and bioelectronics for medical applications. Our interdisciplinary work is tied under the unified theme of high throughput and big data in research and clinical settings. Our current projects involve two thrusts:

  1. Multiphase microfluidics for high throughput biology. Organisms are complex systems involving tens of thousands of genes, proteins, and regulatory sequences which interact together in interconnected chemical networks. Modern biological research, including the areas of '-omics' and systems biology, relies on high-throughput screening (HTS) instruments which can perform assays involving large number of such biomolecules. These instruments must be able to do so with high speed, low cost, and minimal reagent consumption. An emerging class of microfluidic devices utilizes water-in-oil droplets as chemical reaction containers. With typical dimensions of <100 micrometers and with volumes on the order of nanoliters to femtoliters, droplet systems have the potential to manage large libraries of chemical reactions while consuming minimal amounts of reagents. Our work in this area focuses on the physics of multiphase flow, the manipulation of droplets using interfacial phenomena, and label-free biodetection.

  2. Microelectronics for biosensing and high throughput screening. Microelectronics have become pervasive and accessible in the information age, creating a significant opportunity for portable, high speed bioinstrumentation in transforming medicine. Our work in this area takes a translational approach, spanning the areas of healthcare, environmental, and biological applications. Current projects include ultraminiature wearable biosensors for health monitoring, a portable ballast water biodetection system for preventing invasive species in the Great Lakes, optical microplates for screening phytosynthetic algae, and high speed electronics for multiplexed flow cytometry.

Please click on the Research tab to browse some of our current projects.

NSF disclaimer: Some of our work is supported by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF.

Lab News

Droplet Morphometry and Velocimetry (DMV)

When performing biochemical assays in droplets, a great deal of relevant information is encoded into a droplet's physical characteristics, such its size, shape, velocity, trajectory, and pixel intensity. Indeed, many recent reports utilize such characteristics as quantitative measurements for label-free assays. The challenge for researchers in droplet microfluidics is that much of the analysis must be done manually. DMV is a machine vision software which uses image processing techniques to identify and track droplets in digital videos, providing quantitative, time-resolved, label-free measurements. DMV tracks 20 different parameters, including size, shape, trajectory, velocity, pixel statistics, and nearest neighbor spacing. Our Lab on a Chip paper provides details on DMV and how it can be used to analyze common droplet operations and systems reported by industry and academic labs, including: droplet generators, splitting and merging devices, cell encapsulation, serial dilutions, emulsion packing, size distributions and sorting efficiency. DMV provides throughputs of 2-30 frames per second.


View DMV Users in a larger map

DMV is available free of charge to academic researchers. It is currently in use by 35 labs in 14 countries worldwide for droplet and particle tracking as well other as other applications such as insect flight analysis. To obtain a download link, please feel free to contact Prof. Amar Basu at abasu AT eng DOT wayne DOT edu. Accompanying the software are a video training tutorial, installation tutorial and a playlist of videos showing the application of DMV in various operations. We welcome your feedback and novel applications of DMV.

References:

  1. Razieh Kebraei and A.S. Basu, "Autosizing Closed Loop Droplet Generator Using Morphometric Image Feedback,” Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  2. A.S. Basu, "Droplet Morphometry and Velocimetry (DMV): A video processing software for time-resolved, label-free tracking of droplet parameters," Lab on a Chip, April 2013. [doi, pdf]
  3. A.S. Basu, "Droplet Tracking Velocimetry: Automated Measurement of Droplet Motion and Shape Using Digital Image Processing," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  4. Lab on a Chip Blog entry describing DMV.

Modular Droplet Based Microfluidics

Droplet systems provide a high throughput alternative to the microtiter plate used today in genetic, proteomic, and drug screens. While many such systems are fabricated using standard lithography and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), which requires some level of expertise lacking in many biology labs. We showed that simple droplet systems can also be assembled using commercially available components commonly used in conventional biochemistry labs. These modular components can perform the basic unit operations: generation, storage, mixing, and detection of droplet libraries.




   

References:

  1. V. Trivedi, A. Doshi, G.K. Kurup, E. Ereifej, P.J. Vandevord, and A.S. Basu, "A Modular Approach for the Generation, Storage, Mixing, and Detection of Droplet Libraries for High Throughput Screening," Lab on a Chip, 2010. [doi, pdf]

Microfractionation in Droplets

Supported by the NSF Chemical and Biological Separations Program under award #CBET-1032603

Biochemical samples are complex mixtures containing 1000’s of components which often must be fractionated prior to analysis. Conventional fraction collectors, which can only accommodate 10’s of fractions, are not well suited for high throughput analysis. In droplet microfluidics, one of the challenges is how to create a library of droplets containing different chemical compounds. Microfractionation in droplets (µFD) is a scalable microfluidic technique for fractionating complex mixtures into droplet containers. A drop generator, placed downstream from a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) column, encapsulates the separated components into a serial array of monodisperse droplets. This prevents dispersion of the separated compounds, and allows thousands of droplet fractions without phsyical containers. The droplet library can be stored and subsequently mixed with a target reagent using a downstream tee junction. In principle, µFD can be coupled to a wide variety of separation processes, enabling high throughput fractionation and screening of complex mixtures in µL to sub-nL volumes.

   

References:

  1. S. Hamed, B. Shay, and A.S. Basu, "Capillary Fractionation of HPLC Substrates by a Microfluidic Droplet Generator for High Throughput Analysis," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.
  2. V. Trivedi, A. Doshi, G.K. Kurup, E. Ereifej, P.J. Vandevord, and A.S. Basu, "A Modular Approach for the Generation, Storage, Mixing, and Detection of Droplet Libraries for High Throughput Screening," Lab on a Chip, 2010. [doi, pdf]
  3. P. Sehgal, A. Doshi, and A.S. Basu, "Microfractionation of CE-Separated Compounds into Droplets," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.

Hydrodynamic Particle Concentration inside a Drop

One of the current challenges in droplet systems is the inability to perform heterogeneous biochemical assays, which require particle concentration, mixing, and washing steps. Although there are many particle concentration techniques in continuous-phase microfluidics, relatively few are available in multiphase microfluidics. Towards this end, we are developing a passive technique for concentrating particles in water-in-oil plugs which relies on the interaction between particle sedimentation and the recirculating vortices inherent to multiphase plug flow. The concentration phenomena is governed by the Shields number, a dimensionless parameter which depends on plug velocity and the particle properties. The two important operations of concentration and mixing can be achieved simply by changing the plug velocity. This is the first field-free technique for particle concentration in discrete plugs.

   

References:

  1. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu,"Field Free Particle Focusing in a Microfluidic Plug," Biomicrofluidics Special Issue on Multiphase Microfluidics, vol. 6, pp. 022008, April 2012.
  2. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Hydrodynamic Particle Concentration in a Microfluidic Plug," Proc. Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), Oct. 2010, Groningen, The Netherlands.
  3. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Shape Dependent Laplace Vortices in Deformed Liquid-Liquid Slug Flow," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.

Tensiophoresis: Label Free Droplet Sorting

Supported by the NSF Particulate and Multiphase Processes Program under award #CBET-1236764

Sorting droplets based on size and chemical contents is an important capability in droplet-based high throughput screening. We are investigating a novel, label-free sorting technique called tensiophoresis. Tensiophoresis exploits liquid-liquid capillary migration of droplets in a controlled interfacial tension (IFT) gradient in a manner analogous to other phoretic separation techniques. We can generate a sharp IFT gradient by using two laminar streams with differing surfactant concentration. The IFT in the two streams can differ by >10 mN/m, yielding substantial capillary pressures. As a result, droplets near the interface migrate down the IFT gradient toward the upper stream. The migration velocity is dependent on the droplet's size and IFT, enabling sorting based on both of these parameters.

   

The ability to sort droplets by their IFT is particularly interesting, because it is closely linked to the droplet's chemical composition. Droplets containing pure water (left) migrate to the lower bifurcation, while those containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (right) do not. This is the first known label free approach for sorting droplet microreactors based on their biochemical contents.

References:

  1. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Deterministic Protein Extraction from Droplets Using Interfacial Drag and Tensiophoresis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  2. 3. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Size Based Droplet Sorting with Wide Tuning Range Using Tensiophoresis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  3. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Passive, Label-Free Droplet Sorting based on Chemical Composition using Tensiophoresis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  4. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Tensiophoresis: Migration and Sorting of Droplets in an Interfacial Tension Gradient," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.
  5. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, Submitted.

Optofluidic Tweezers

Supported by the NSF Electronic, Photonic, and Magnetic Devices Program under award #ECCS-1232226

Optical techniques for manipulating liquids and particles have been a long standing interest in physics and biology. Optical tools are attractive because they provide dynamic manipulation and do not require on-chip structures. Optical tweezers (OT) have been widely used, but are not ideally suited for large scale manipulation because they have relatively low force (pN), and the forces are typically repulsive. Optoelectronic tweezers (OET) can provide larger forces (nN), but they require on-chip electric fields. We are investigating optofluidic tweezers (OFT), where droplets are trapped and manipulated using optically generated, spherically confined thermocapillary flows. This approach can trap droplets with holding forces in the µN range, which are 100 stronger than OET, and >100,000 times stronger than optical tweezers.

References:

  1. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Indirect Particle Manipulation using a Scanning Optofluidic Tweezer," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  2. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Optofluidic Tweezers: Manipulation of Oil Droplets with 105 Greater Force than Optical Tweezers," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.
  3. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Rolling, Aligning, and Trapping Droplets on a Laser Beam using Marangoni Optofluidic Tweezers," Proc. Intl. Conference on Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), June 2011, Beijing China.
  4. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Optofluidic Tweezers", Wayne State University Tech Transfer, Case 11-1048, patent pending.

Microfluidic Manipulation using Marangoni Flows

Fluids behave differently at small length scales. Many conventional phenomena, such as pressure driven flow and gravitational effects, become less efficient, while others, like surface tension-based phenomena, become relatively stronger. (In nature, such scaling phenomena allows insects to walk on water.) In designing micro and nanoscale systems, our lab investigates the use of surface-tension driven Marangoni flows for fluid manipulation. We engineer Marangoni flows by delivering localized thermal fields, and utilize them for actuating single- and multi-phase fluidic systems.

   

References:

  1. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Virtual microfluidic traps, filters, channels and pumps using Marangoni flows," Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, vol. 18, pp. 110531, 2008. [doi, pdf]
  2. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Shaping High-Speed Marangoni Flow in Liquid Films by Microscale Perturbations in Surface Temperature," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 90, pp. 03410/1-03410-3, 2007. [doi, pdf]
  3. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Microfluidic Doublets in Aqueous Samples Generated by Microfabricated Thermal Probes," Sensors and Actuators A:Physical, vol. 158, pp. 116-120, 2010. [doi, pdf]
  4. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "A Programmable Array for Contact-Free Manipulation of Floating Droplets on Featureless Substrates by the Modulation of Surface Tension," Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 18, pp. 1163-1172, 2009. [doi, pdf]

Optical Microplates

 

Biological systems respond not only to chemical stimuli (drugs, proteins) but also to physical stimuli (light, heat, stress). Though there are many high throughput tools for screening chemical stimuli, no such tool exists for screening of physical stimuli. We are building novel instruments for high throughput screening of photosynthesis, a light-driven bioprocess. The optical microplate has a footprint identical to a standard 96 well plate, and it provides temporal and intensity control of light in each individual well. Intensity control provides 128 dimming levels (7-bit resolution), with maximum intensity 120 mE/cm2. Temporal modulation, used for studying dynamics and regulation of photosynthesis, can be as low as 10 µs. We use photonic screening for high throughput studies of algal growth rates and photosynthetic efficiency, using the model organism Dunaliella tertiolecta, a lipid producing algae of interest in biofuel production. Due to the ability to conduct 96 studies in parallel, experiments that would require 2 years using conventional tools can be completed in 1 week. This instrument opens up novel high throughput protocols for photobiology and the growing field of phenomics.

References:

  1. Eric A. Davidson, A.S. Basu, Travis S. Bayer, "Programming Microbes Using Pulse Width Modulation of Optical Signals," Journal of Molecular Biology, August 2013. [doi]
  2. M. Chen, T. Mertiri, T. Holland, and A.S. Basu, "Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae," Lab on a Chip, vol. 12, pp. 3870-3874, September 2012. [doi, pdf]
  3. T. Mertiri, M. Chen, A. Hundich, T. Holland, and A.S. Basu, "Optical Microplates for Photonic High Throughput Screening of Algal Photosynthesis and Biofuel Production," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.
  4. A.S. Basu, "Environmental Microplates", Wayne State University Tech Transfer, Case 11-1061, patent pending.

ECE 7995: BioMEMS and Bioinstrumentation

This graduate course will cover biomedical microsystems, focusing on microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip technologies for in-vitro diagnostics. Students will learn about this highly interdisciplinary field which deals with microscale physics, the fabrication of biomedical microsystems, and the use of these integrated systems for biological assays.

ECE 4570 Electronics II (Solid State Electronics)

Aspects of electrical properties of semiconductors, the physical electronics of P-N junction, bipolar, field effect transistors, and device fabrication technology essential to understanding semiconductor active devices and integrated circuits. Introduction to the behavior of semiconductor and electronics devices. Students also take part in a semiconductor fabrication lab, where they learn about the microfabrication processes used to manufacture and test semiconductor devices including resistors, diodes, and MOSFETs.

ECE 4800 Electromagnetic Fields and Waves

Fundamentals of electromagnetic engineering, static electric and magnetic fields using vector analysis and fields of steady currents, Maxwell's equations and boundary value problems. Basic principles of plane waves, transmission lines and radiation.

ECE 9997 Doctoral Seminar

Weekly research seminar for graduate students in Electrical and Computer Engineering. This year's seminar schedule can be found here.

Fall 2010 Office Hours: Monday 6-7:30PM, Thursday 2-3:30PM, and by appointment.
Location: 3133 ENG.

PI

Amar Basu, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Research Interests: Microfluidics, electronics, and bioMEMS for high throughput screening and analytical chemistry

Graduate Students

Gopakumar Kamalakshakurup
Graduate Student, Electrical Engineering
Research Interests: Droplet microfluidics, high throughput detection and screening
Email: ef9605@wayne.edu
Khaled Dadesh
Graduate Student, Electrical Engineering
Research Interests: Multiplexed, high throughput detection and flow cytometry
Email: k_dadesh@wayne.edu
Razieh Kebriaei
Graduate Student, Biomedical Engineering
Email: razieh.kebriaei@wayne.edu
Research Interests: Chemical separations, microfractionation in droplets

Roxana Javid
Graduate Student, Biomedical Engineering
Email: fb5997@wayne.edu
Research Interests: biodetection systems for environmental applications

Undergraduates

Bomi Shim
Undergraduate, Electrical and Computer Engineering
Email: bomi.shim@wayne.edu
Research Interests: Wireless sensors, Bluetooth

Grade School Students

  • Vipul Nandigala, Junior, Walled Lake Western High School
  • Ajay Arora (middle school)

Past Students

  • Deepak Chandrasekar, MS, Electrical Engineering
  • Ankur Doshi, MS, Electrical Engineering
  • Varun Trivedi, MS, Biomedical Engineering
  • Shereef Hamed, MS, Biomedical Engineering
  • Priyanka Sehgal, MS, Biomedical Engineering
  • Vamsee Ganti, MS, Electrical Engineering
  • Joseph Akroush, BS, Electrical Engineering
  • Taulant Mertiri, Undergraduate, Electrical Engineering
  • Rizwan Ahmad, Undergraduate, Electrical Engineering
  • Abraham Mezaael, Undergraduate, Electrical Engineering
  • Rafal Mahdi, Undergraduate, Biology
  • Anthony Miller, Undergraduate, Pre-med

Current and Past Collaborators

  • Travis Bayer, Cambridge University
  • Wendell Lim, UC San Franscisco
  • Jeffrey Ram, Wayne State University Medical School
  • Pamela Vandevord, Biomedical Engineering, Virginia Tech
  • Yogesh Gianchandani, University of Michigan
  • Brian Shay, University of Michigan
  • Thomas Holland, Wayne State University School of Medicine
  • Philip Levy, Wayne State University School of Medicine
  • Bengt Arnetz, Wayne State University School of Medicine
  • Yawen Li, Lawrence Technological University
Note: Downloads are for personal use only, and may not be distributed without permission of the publisher.

Journal Publications

  1. Eric A. Davidson, A.S. Basu, Travis S. Bayer, "Programming Microbes Using Pulse Width Modulation of Optical Signals," Journal of Molecular Biology, August 2013. [doi, pdf]
  2. A.S. Basu, "Droplet Morphometry and Velocimetry (DMV): A video processing software for time-resolved, label-free tracking of droplet parameters," Lab on a Chip, April 2013. [doi, pdf]
  3. M. Chen, T. Mertiri, T. Holland, and A.S. Basu, "Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae," Lab on a Chip, vol. 12, pp. 3870-3874, September 2012. [doi, pdf]
  4. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu,"Field Free Particle Focusing in a Microfluidic Plug," Biomicrofluidics Special Issue on Multiphase Microfluidics, vol. 6, pp. 022008, April 2012. [doi, pdf]
  5. V. Trivedi, A. Doshi, G.K. Kurup, E. Ereifej, P.J. Vandevord, and A.S. Basu, "A Modular Approach for the Generation, Storage, Mixing, and Detection of Droplet Libraries for High Throughput Screening," Lab on a Chip, 2010. [doi, pdf]
  6. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Microfluidic Doublets in Aqueous Samples Generated by Microfabricated Thermal Probes," Sensors and Actuators A:Physical, vol. 158, pp. 116-120, 2010. [doi, pdf]
  7. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "A Programmable Array for Contact-Free Manipulation of Floating Droplets on Featureless Substrates by the Modulation of Surface Tension," Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, vol. 18, pp. 1163-1172, 2009. [doi, pdf]
  8. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Nanopatterning: Surfaces Feel the Heat," Nature Nanotechnology, vol. 4, pp. 622-623, 2009. [doi, pdf]
  9. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Virtual microfluidic traps, filters, channels and pumps using Marangoni flows," Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, vol. 18, pp. 110531, 2008. [doi, pdf]
  10. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Shaping High-Speed Marangoni Flow in Liquid Films by Microscale Perturbations in Surface Temperature," Applied Physics Letters, vol. 90, pp. 03410/1-03410-3, 2007. [doi, pdf]
  11. A.S. Basu, S. McNamara, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Scanning Thermal Lithography: Maskless, Submicron Thermo-Chemical Patterning of Photoresist by Ultracompliant Probes," Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology B, vol. 22, pp. 3217-3220, 2004. [doi, pdf]
  12. S. McNamara, A.S. Basu, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Ultracompliant thermal probe array for scanning non-planar surfaces without force feedback", Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, vol. 15, pp. 237-243, 2004. [doi, pdf]

Conference Publications

  1. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Label-Free Detection of Proteins by Drop Shape Analysis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2014, San Antonio TX.
  2. R. Kebriaei and A.S. Basu, "Label-Free Inline HPLC Detector using a Drop Generator," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2014, San Antonio TX.
  3. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Microfractionation of Gases Separated by Gas Chromatography," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2014, San Antonio TX.
  4. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Viscophoresis: Migration and Sorting of Droplets in a Viscosity Gradient," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2014, San Antonio TX.
  5. R.M. Javid, S. Noman, A. Akram, A.S. Basu, and J. Ram, “Automated Ballast Water Treatment Verification,” Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS), January 2014, San Diego CA.
  6. R. Kebriaei and A.S. Basu, “Inline Label-Free Protein Detection Using Interfacial Tension,” Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS), January 2014, San Diego CA.
  7. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Deterministic Protein Extraction from Droplets Using Interfacial Drag and Tensiophoresis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  8. Razieh Kebraei and A.S. Basu, "Autosizing Closed Loop Droplet Generator Using Morphometric Image Feedback,” Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  9. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Size Based Droplet Sorting with Wide Tuning Range Using Tensiophoresis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  10. K.M. Dadesh and A.S. Basu, “40 MHz Frequency Multiplexed Electronic System for Multicolor Droplet Flow Cytometry,” Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  11. Ashrafuzzaman Bulbul, A.S. Basu, and Hanseup Kim, “Characterization of Microbubbles of Multiple Gases in Microfluidic Channels,” Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2013, Freiburg Germany.
  12. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Passive, Label- Free Droplet Sorting based on Chemical Composition using Tensiophoresis," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  13. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Field-Free Particle Segregation and Extraction for Bead-Based Assays in Plugs," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  14. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Indirect Particle Manipulation using a Scanning Optofluidic Tweezer," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  15. A.S. Basu, "Droplet Tracking Velocimetry: Automated Measurement of Droplet Motion and Shape Using Digital Image Processing," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2012, Okinawa Japan.
  16. D. Chandrasekar, B. Arnetz, P. Levy, and A.S. Basu, “Plug-and-Play, Single-Chip Photoplethysmography,” IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology, August 2012, San Diego, CA.
  17. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Tensiophoresis: Migration and Sorting of Droplets in an Interfacial Tension Gradient," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.
  18. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Optofluidic Tweezers: Manipulation of Oil Droplets with 105 Greater Force than Optical Tweezers," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.
  19. K.M. Dadesh and A.S. Basu, "Multicolor LIF detection in a Single Optical Window Using Phase-Sensitive Multiplexing," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.
  20. P. Sehgal, A. Doshi, and A.S. Basu, "Microfractionation of CE-Separated Compounds into Droplets," Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), October 2011, Seattle WA.
  21. S. Hamed, B. Shay, and A.S. Basu, "Capillary Fractionation of HPLC Substrates by a Microfluidic Droplet Generator for High Throughput Analysis," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.
  22. T. Mertiri, M. Chen, A. Hundich, T. Holland, and A.S. Basu, "Optical Microplates for Photonic High Throughput Screening of Algal Photosynthesis and Biofuel Production," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.
  23. K. Dadesh, and A.S. Basu, "High Speed Low-Noise Multiplexed Three Color Absorbance Photometry," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.
  24. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Shape Dependent Laplace Vortices in Deformed Liquid-Liquid Slug Flow," IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology (EMBC), September 2011, Boston MA.
  25. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Rolling, Aligning, and Trapping Droplets on a Laser Beam using Marangoni Optofluidic Tweezers," Proc. Intl. Conference on Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), June 2011, Beijing China.
  26. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Hydrodynamic Particle Concentration in a Microfluidic Plug," Proc. Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), Oct. 2010, Groningen, The Netherlands.
  27. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Multispectral Photometry with a Single Light Detector Using Frequency Division Multiplexing," Proc. Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), Oct. 2010, Groningen, The Netherlands.
  28. A. Doshi, V. Trivedi, P. Sehgal, and A.S. Basu, "Digital Chromatography and the Formation of Heterogeneous droplet Libraries using Microfractionation in Droplets (µFD)," Proc. Micro Total Analysis Systems (MicroTAS), Nov. 2009, Jeju, Korea. [pdf]
  29. V. Trivedi, E.S. Ereifej, A. Doshi, P. Sehgal, P.J. VandeVord, and A.S. Basu, "Microfluidic Encapsulation of Cells in Alginate Capsules for High Throughput Screening," Proc. IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (EMBC), Sept. 2009, Minneapolis, MN. [doi, pdf]
  30. K. Visvanathan, F. Shariff, S.Y. Yee, and A.S. Basu, "Propulsion and Steering of a Floating Mini-Robot Based on Marangoni Flow Actuation," Proc. Intl. Conference on Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), June 2009, Denver, Colorado. [doi, pdf]
  31. A.S. Basu and Y.B. Gianchandani, "A 128-Bit Digitallly Programmable Microfluidic Platform for Non-Contact Droplet Actuation Using Marangoni Flows," Proc. Intl. Conference on Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), June 2007, Lyon, France. [doi, pdf]
  32. A.S. Basu, Seow Yuen Yee, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Virtual Components for Droplet Control Using Marangoni Flows: Size-Selective Filters, Traps, Channels, and Pumps," Proc. IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Jan. 2007, Kobe, Japan. [doi, pdf]
  33. S. Mutlu, A.S. Basu, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Maskless Electrochemical Patterning of Gold Films for BioSensors Using Micromachined Polyimide Probes," Proc. IEEE Conference on Sensors, Nov. 2005, Irvine, CA, pp. 1173-1177. [doi, pdf]
  34. A.S. Basu, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Microthermal Techniques for Mixing, Concentration, and Harvesting DNA and Other Microdroplet Suspensions," Proc. International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences (MicroTAS), Oct. 2005, Boston, MA, pp. 131-135. [pdf]
  35. A.S. Basu, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Trapping and Manipulation of Particles and Droplets Using Micro-Toroidal Convection Currents," Proc. Intl. Conference on Solid State Sensors, Actuators, and Microsystems (Transducers), June 2005, Seoul, Korea, pp. 85-88. [doi, pdf]
  36. A.S. Basu, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "High Speed Microfluidic Doublet Flow in Open Pools Driven by Non-Contact Micromachined Thermal Sources," Proc. IEEE International Conference on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Jan. 2005, Miami Beach, FL, pp 666-669. [doi, pdf]
  37. A.S. Basu, S. McNamara, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Maskless Lithography by Patterned Heating of Photoresist Using Ultracompliant Thermal Probe Arrays," Proc. Electron, Ion, Photon Beam Technology and Nanofabrication (EIPBN), May 2004, San Diego, CA, pp. 109- 111. [pdf]
  38. S. McNamara, A.S. Basu, and Y.B. Gianchandani, "Ultracompliant, Passively Decoupled Thermal Probe Arrays: Large Area Mapping of Non-Planar Surfaces Without Force Feedback," Proc. IEEE International Conference. on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS), Jan. 2004, Maastricht, The Netherlands, pp. 825-828. [doi, pdf]

Thesis

  1. A.S. Basu, "Microthermal Devices for Fluidic Actuation by Modulation of Surface Tension," Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Michigan, August 2008. [pdf]

Patents

  1. A.S. Basu, "Environmental Microplates", Wayne State University Tech Transfer, Case 11-1061, patent pending.
  2. G.K. Kurup and A.S. Basu, "Optofluidic Tweezers", Wayne State University Tech Transfer, Case 11-1048, patent pending.
  3. B. Mitra, A. Gaitas, A.S. Basu, and W. Zhu, "Scanning Probe Assisted localized CNT growth," Picocal Inc., patent pending.
  4. Y. B. Gianchandani, and A.S. Basu, "Marangoni Convection Driven by Micro-Scale Thermal Sources, and its Application to Single Molecule Detection," U.S. Patent 7358051, University of Michigan, April 15, 2008. [google]
  5. Y.B. Gianchandani, S.P. McNamara, J. Lee, and A.S. Basu, "Micromachined Thermal Probe Apparatus, System for Thermal Scanning a Sample in Contact Mode, and Cantilevered Reference Probe for Use Therein," U.S. Patent 7073938, University of Michigan, July 11, 2006. [google]
  6. M.S. McCorquodale, S. Pernia, and A.S. Basu, "Frequency calibration for a monolithic clock generator and timing/frequency reference," U.S. Patent 7248124, Mobius Microsystems, July 24, 2007. [google]
  7. M.S. McCorquodale, S. Pernia, and A.S. Basu, "Monolithic clock generator and timing/frequency reference," U.S. Patent 7227423, Mobius Microsystems, Jun 5, 2007. [google]

Nanotechnology Programs at the Detroit Science Center

Nanotechology is quickly becoming a pervasive and fundamental component of science and technology. The microfluidics laboratory is collaborating with the Detroit Science Center, the city's premiere source for K-12 science education, to develop modules for educating and inspiring future scientists and engineers in the micro and nanoscale worlds.

Wayne State University Summer Research Academy (SURA)

Sponsored by the National Science Foundation's Michigan Louis Stoke Alliance Minority Participation (MI-LSAMP) program, SURA is an effort designed by Wayne State's MI-LSAMP Work Group to provide summer research opportunities primarily to first and second year undergraduate students at Wayne State and other partner institutions, including Michigan State University, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, and Western Michigan University. MI-LSAMP aims to significantly increase the number of minority students earning baccalaureate degrees each year in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematical (STEM) fields and prepare them for entry into graduate programs.

Now Hiring Ph.D. Students and Postdocs!

The Microfluidics and BioMEMS laboratory is currently looking for Ph.D. students and postdoctoral scholars who are motivated and passionate about developing micro and nanosystems for biotechnology. Our lab is developing high throughput, electronically controlled microfluidic ‘lab-on-a-chip’ systems which can be applied to genomics, proteomics, and drug discovery. It is an exciting, cross-disciplinary research area with tremendous potential for innovation and learning.

Ph.D. students will be hired as directed study or student assistant. Based on student performance, this will lead to a GRA position. At this point I am only considering students who are committed to completing the Ph.D. program. Preference will be given to those with prior experience in biotechnology and microfabrication, and to those who are almost finished with their graduate coursework. Postdocs will be hired full time with salary commensurate with experience. Prior experience in microfabrication and/or biomedical assays is a plus, but not required. Interested individuals, please send me a CV and a brief statement of research interests.

About Wayne State University

Located in the heart of midtown Detroit's cultural district, Wayne State University is a designated Carnegie 1 research university with very high research activity (VHRA), placing in the top 3.6% of US public universities. In addition, it falls within the top 60 public universities for research expenditure ($226 million), of which 70% is in medical and biomedical sciences. The Microfluidics and BioMEMS laboratory collaborates with the Wayne State University School of Medicine and the Karmanos Cancer Institute, one of the nation's 41 top National Cancer Institute designated comprehensive cancer centers. The Electrical and Computer Engineering department houses the Smart Sensors and Integrated Microsystems (SSIM) Laboratory, a $7.1 million dollar facility offering 5,000 square feet of class 10/100 clean room as well as biosafety level 2 lab space. SSIM offers a state of the art environment for microfabrication, nanofabrication, metrology, cell culture, and biological assays. The College of Engineering is now expanding into the $27 million Martin Danto Engineering Development Center, which opened in Winter 2009.

Amar S. Basu

Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Wayne State University
3133 Engineering Building
5050 Anthony Wayne Drive
Detroit, MI 48202
Phone: 313-577-3990
Fax: 313-577-1101
Email: abasu AT eng DOT wayne DOT edu
CV

Research Interests

Microfluidics, bioMEMS, and integrated microsystems for applications in biotechnology and nanotechnology. Specific interests include:
  • High-throughput screening systems for cellular and biomolecular analysis
  • Droplet-based microfluidics
  • Surface tension-based phenomena
  • Wearable biomedical sensors
  • Devices for single cell analysis
  • Scanning thermal probes for microscopy, lithography, and sensing

Education

Honors

  • Wayne State University Outstanding Faculty Service Award, 2013
  • IEEE Professor of the Year (voted by ECE students), 2008
  • "Virtual microfluidic traps, filters, channels and pumps using Marangoni flows" selected for Institute of Physics Highlights of 2008
  • Sandia National Laboratories Harry S. Truman Fellowship, 2008 [declined]
  • University of Michigan Zell Laurie Entreprenurial Institute Opportunity award, 2006
  • Whitaker Foundation Biomedical Graduate Research Fellowship, 2003
  • NSF Graduate Fellowship, Honorable Mention, 2003

Activities

  • Reviewer for Lab on Chip, Applied Physics Letters, Electrophoresis, Microfluidics and Nanofluidics, Sensors and Actuators, Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering, Biomedical Microdevices, ACS Applied Materials, and Wiley
  • Editorial Review Board, IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology
  • Technical Committee, Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS)
  • Panelist for National Science Foundation, NSERC Canada, US-Israel Binational Science Foundation, Academy of Finland
  • Lecturer and curriculum developmet at Detroit Science Center